foto1
foto1
foto1
foto1
foto1
foto1
foto1
foto1
foto1
foto1

Downhill Skateboarding

Buttboarding

Street Luge

Gravity Bike

Downhill Inline

Examples

Here you will find an example set of FAQs.

Q: What is Downhill Skateboarding?

A: The name Downhill Skateboarding describes this class perfectly. Competitors stand upright on longboards and ride in an aerodynamic “tuck” position at speeds in excess of 120 km/h (75 mph).  Downhill Skateboarding is also known as “Speedboarding” and “Stand up”.  The skater’s hands are used as outriggers to help them maintain balance and stability while cornering.  Hard plastic pucks are attached to their gloves so they can place their hand on the pavement incurring only minimal friction.  Braking is accomplished by either dragging one foot on the ground, or pitching the skateboard sideways in a controlled slide.  Decks are typically 34”- 48” in length and constructed from materials including wood, carbon fiber, Kevlar, fiberglass, aluminum, titanium and structural foam.  Racing trucks are typically CNC machined from aluminum billet.  Wheels are made from advanced polyurethane formulas to provide low rolling resistance, vibration dampening, traction, and are typically between 70-90mm in diameter.

Q: What is Street Luge?

A: Street Luge has its’ roots firmly in skateboarding.  In the 1970’s there was a downhill skateboarding competition in Signal Hill, California that featured highly modified, fully enclosed skateboards known as “Skatecars”.  They proved so dangerous that they were essentially abandoned after the 1977 Signal Hill event.  Rising from their ashes came increasingly sophisticated “Lay Down” skateboards that were used on the twisty, mountain roads of Southern California.  After remaining underground for nearly two decades, ESPN adopted the sport for the inaugural 1995 X Games and renamed it “Street Luge.”  Competitors lay down in the supine (feet first) position and control the oversize skateboard by leaning their bodies.  Braking is accomplished by dragging the shoe soles on the pavement.  Today’s street luge is a highly sophisticated vehicle constructed from a variety of materials including carbon fiber, Kevlar, fiberglass, aluminum, titanium, steel, structural foam, and other exotic materials. Between two and four trucks are typically CNC machined from aluminum billet.  Four to eight wheels made from advanced polyurethane formulas provide low rolling resistance, vibration dampening, traction and are typically between 70-90mm in diameter.  Speeds at Teutonia Brazil can exceed 135 km/h (84 mph)!

Q: What is Classic Luge?

A: Soon after the first skateboard was invented, its’ creator likely sat down on it and realized that it worked well that way too.  This is how Classic Luge or “Buttboarding” got its’ start.  In the late 80’s a group of Austrian snowboarding enthusiasts began riding their skateboards down from the Kaurnatal Resort after a day of snowboarding.  Over time their hobby grew into a fully organized race known as Hot Heels Kaurnatal.  To maintain the spirit of those early days, this class is the most restricted IGSA racing category.  Boards must be constructed of wood and wheels cannot exceed 70mm in diameter.  The trucks must be commercially available.  The idea behind Classic Luge is to keep technology minimal so that the rider skill is the determining factor.  Top speeds in Classic Luge tend to only be marginally slower than those achieved in Street Luge.

TOPSKATE PRO TEUTÔNIA
Big Air Street Luge
2002 Big Air History